Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi - SEVEN SISTERS DREAMING GP1964

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Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi Seven Sisters Dreaming Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas GP1964
Seven Sisters Dreaming Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas GP1964
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi Seven Sisters Dreaming GP1964
Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi Seven Sisters Dreaming Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas GP1964
Seven Sisters Dreaming Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas GP1964
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi Seven Sisters Dreaming GP1964

PROVENANCE

The provenance of works of fine art is of great significance, especially to their owner. There are a number of reasons why painting provenance is important. A good provenance increases the value of a painting, and establishing provenance may help confirm the date, artist and the subject of a painting. It may confirm whether a painting is genuinely of the period it seems to date from. Documented evidence of provenance for an object can help to establish that it has not been altered and is not a forgery, a reproduction, stolen or looted art. Provenance helps assign the work to a known artist, and a documented history can be of use in helping to prove ownership.

All artworks of our Gallery come with a AAA Gallery Certificate of Authenticity and where possible, working photographs and/or a photo of the artist with the artwork and/or video of an artist in working process of creating an artwork.

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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Lay-by is a system of paying a deposit to secure an article for later purchase. AAA Gallery offers you a four-month lay-by option on all artworks, allowing you to make regular payments towards that artwork you like.

A 25% initial deposit is required with the balance paid over a maximum of four months.  You will not be penalised if you prefer to pay your purchase sooner. Once you finalise the payments the goods will be dispatched immediately.

If this payment method is chosen when you checkout, we will email you a lay-by agreement to organise first instalment and subsequent the other three equal payments.  

Please contact us if you have any questions.

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Artist: Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi
Skin Name: Nungurrayi
Born: 19-09-1967
Region: PAPUNYA, West of Alice Springs, NT
Language: Anmatyerre 
Subjects and Themes(Dreaming): Her paintings depict stories such as Bush Tucker (Exploding Seed and Black Seed from the Mt. Allan area), Women's Ceremonies, Serpent, Goanna, Grandmother’s Country and Seven Sisters Dreamings.

 

ABOUT ARTIST

 


Born in 1967 in Mt. Allan, Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi is the eldest daughter of renowned artist Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri. She was taught to paint by her father at a very young age, and since her father passing away, the value of her works has increased dramatically. His influences are apparent in her work, yet she has formed a style of her own.

Her paintings depict stories such as Bush Tucker (Exploding Seed and Black Seed from the Mt. Allan area), Women's Ceremonies, Serpent, Goanna and Seven Sisters Dreamings. Gabriella's work is bold and vivid in colour and composition and utilises many different techniques, the "dot" technique in particular. One of the significant stories that Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi paints is titled Grandmother’s Country. The subject relates to Gabriella’s Grandmother’s Country near Mt Allan in the Northern Territory. This is an important place for her family, where bush food in abundance and women are shown in the paintings collecting the food. There are waterholes and meeting places depicted and many types of bush food are identified including berries, yams and honey ants.

In 1985, at the tender age of 16, Gabriella won the coveted Alice Springs Art Award while still a student at Yirara Lutheran College in Alice Springs. She is recognised as a culturally significant artist and her work has been exhibited in the U.S.A and throughout Europe. Her work is in many major collections including the National Gallery of Australia and most recently she was commissioned to complete a twenty metre art installation depicting her custodial Grandmother's Country for the 2008 RHS Chelsea Flower Show which was awarded the Gold Metal. She now lives in Melbourne with her husband and five children.

 

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

  • 1987 exhibition in Brisbane with her father Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri and sister Michelle Possum
  • 1988 Aboriginal 'Dot' Painting, Melbourne
  • 1992 Coo-ee Gallery, Sydney
  • 1992 Washington DC, U.S.A.
  • 1993 Berne, Switzerland
  • 1998 'Sztuka Aborygenow - (Art of the Aborigines)', Warsaw, Poland
  • 1999 Flinders University Art Museum, Adelaide
  • 1999 Aboriginal Art Galleries of Australia, Melbourne
  • 2000 United Nations, New York
  • 2001 Mia Mia Gallery, Melbourne.
  • 2009 Solo Exhibition, Kate Owen Gallery, Rozelle, Sydney

 

COLLECTIONS

  • National Gallery of Australia (Canberra)
  • Museum Art Gallery of the Northern Territory
  • Flinders University Art museum Adelaide
  • Holmes A Court Collection,
  • Kelton Foundation Collection, USA
  • Winterthur Collection, Switzerland and many others.

 

AWARDS

  • 1991, Professional Development Grant, from the Aboriginal Arts Unit of the Australia Council for the Arts.
  • 1993 Alice Springs Art Prize Record Cover for 'Coloured Stone'.

This is the ancient myth of the Milky Way and the Seven Sisters (Pleiades). This Dreaming was inherited by Gabriella from her mother and grandmother, and given to Gabriella by her father. This story takes place at the “twenty mile” located near Napperby Creek in the Northern Territory. The Seven Sisters travelled over a vast expanse of country until they realised that they were being followed by a man called Wati-Nyiru (who was a Tjakamarra man). He was an evil person who wanted to seduce the sisters, and so the sisters were frightened of him. They tried to hide from him in caves, but he began to disguise himself as many things, including a snake, to deceive them. With little hope of escaping from him, the Seven Sisters escaped through a fire at Kurlunyalimpa to the Milky Way, where they became the stars of the Pleiades in the Constellation Taurus. There they are safe and watch over all the women on earth. Wati-Nyiru then followed them to the heavens, and became the star Orion, destined to follow them as they move across the night sky. The seven concentric circles represent the Seven Sisters, while the lone star depicts Orion (the Tjakamarra man).

MORE ARTWORKS BY THE ARTIST

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