Thomas Tjapaltjarri - TINGARI CYCLE TT1721

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Thomas Tjapaltjarri Tingari Cycle Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas TT1721

PROVENANCE

The provenance of works of fine art is of great significance, especially to their owner. There are a number of reasons why painting provenance is important. A good provenance increases the value of a painting, and establishing provenance may help confirm the date, artist and the subject of a painting. It may confirm whether a painting is genuinely of the period it seems to date from. Documented evidence of provenance for an object can help to establish that it has not been altered and is not a forgery, a reproduction, stolen or looted art. Provenance helps assign the work to a known artist, and a documented history can be of use in helping to prove ownership.

All artworks of our Gallery come with a AAA Gallery Certificate of Authenticity and where possible, working photographs and/or a photo of the artist with the artwork and/or video of an artist in working process of creating an artwork.

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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Lay-by is a system of paying a deposit to secure an article for later purchase. AAA Gallery offers you a four-month lay-by option on all artworks, allowing you to make regular payments towards that artwork you like.

A 25% initial deposit is required with the balance paid over a maximum of four months.  You will not be penalised if you prefer to pay your purchase sooner. Once you finalise the payments the goods will be dispatched immediately.

If this payment method is chosen when you checkout, we will email you a lay-by agreement to organise first instalment and subsequent the other three equal payments.  

Please contact us if you have any questions.

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Artist: Thomas Tjapaltjarri
Skin Name: Tjapaltjarri
Born: c.1964
Region: Kiwirrkura, Western Desert
Language: Pintupi
Subjects and Themes(Dreaming): Tingari cycle.

 

ABOUT ARTIST

Thomas Tjapaltjarri was born c.1964 in the Gibson Desert, Western Australia. Thomas and his family droup which includes of four brothers Warlimpirrnga, Walala, Tamlik, and Yari Yari three sisters Yardi, Yikultji and Tjakaraia led a

completely nomadic life until they emerged from the desert, coming to Kiwirrkurra in 1984. They were named "the Last Nomads" or "the Pintupi nine", the family group had had no contact with western society until this point. Astoundingly, he transitioned from an utterly traditional lifestyle to commencing as an artist within a matter of a few years and painting the traditional stories of his people.

Thomas paints simple, geometric designs and uses a dotting technique shared with other Pintupi artists such as his brothers, Warlimpirrnga and Walala, and with Willy and George Ward Tjungurrayi. Thomas's works explore the stories of the Tingari cycle. Tingari are the legendary beings of the Pintupi people that travelled the desert performing rituals, teaching law, creating landforms and shaping what would become ceremonial sites. As far as we can know, the meanings behind Tingari paintings are multi-layered, however, those meaning are not available to the uninitiated.

Thomas and his brothers Walala and Warlimpirringa, have exhibited widely in almost all aboriginal galleries in Australia and overseas.

COLLECTIONS:

  • Hank Ebes Collection, Melbourne, VIC.

Thomas's work depicts the stories of the Tingari cycle. Tingari are the legendary beings of the Pintupi people that travelled the desert performing rituals, teaching law, creating landforms and shaping what would become ceremonial sites. The meanings behind Tingari paintings are multi-layered, however, those meaning are not available to the uninitiated.

MORE ARTWORKS BY THE ARTIST

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