Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri - WOMEN's CEREMONY MC1753

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Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Women’s Ceremony Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas MC1753
Women’s Ceremony Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas MC1753
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Women’s Ceremony MC1753
Aboriginal Artwork on canvas by Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Women’s Ceremony MC1753
Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Women’s Ceremony Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas MC1753
Women’s Ceremony Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas MC1753
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Women’s Ceremony MC1753
Aboriginal Artwork on canvas by Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri Women’s Ceremony MC1753

PROVENANCE

The provenance of works of fine art is of great significance, especially to their owner. There are a number of reasons why painting provenance is important. A good provenance increases the value of a painting, and establishing provenance may help confirm the date, artist and the subject of a painting. It may confirm whether a painting is genuinely of the period it seems to date from. Documented evidence of provenance for an object can help to establish that it has not been altered and is not a forgery, a reproduction, stolen or looted art. Provenance helps assign the work to a known artist, and a documented history can be of use in helping to prove ownership.

All artworks of our Gallery come with a AAA Gallery Certificate of Authenticity and where possible, working photographs and/or a photo of the artist with the artwork and/or video of an artist in working process of creating an artwork.

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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Lay-by is a system of paying a deposit to secure an article for later purchase. AAA Gallery offers you a four-month lay-by option on all artworks, allowing you to make regular payments towards that artwork you like.

A 25% initial deposit is required with the balance paid over a maximum of four months.  You will not be penalised if you prefer to pay your purchase sooner. Once you finalise the payments the goods will be dispatched immediately.

If this payment method is chosen when you checkout, we will email you a lay-by agreement to organise first instalment and subsequent the other three equal payments.  

Please contact us if you have any questions.

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Artist: Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri
Skin Name: Napaltjarri
Born: c.1960
Region: Kintore
Language: 
Subjects and Themes(Dreaming): Women's Ceremony.

 

ABOUT ARTIST

 Maisie Campbell Napaltjarri was born in 1958 near Haasts Bluff, about 300km NW of Alice Springs. The area is home to the Luritja people, who have many Western Arrente and Pintupi family connections. Maisie's language group is

Pintupi.

Maisie spent her formative years at Papunya attending school there. Her first teacher was Geoffrey Bardon, a fact that she remains proud of today. As a young woman, Maisie moved to the Pintupi community of Kintore, about 500km west of Alice Springs, where she married Barney Campbell Tjakamarra (now deceased) and to whom she had four children.

Maisie began painting about 15 years ago. Whilst clearly influenced by her husband and the dotting style adopted by many Pintupi artists, she has developed her own form of expression which is characterised by a free flowing depiction of her stories and a rapid fire approach to dotting. Maisie is imaginative in her use of colours, showing a propensity to experiment in order to achieve the effects she is seeking, yet preserving the inherent cultural integrity of her works.

Maisie is enthusiastic about the preservation of her tribal traditions and worries that her children, at this stage are showing limited interest in her painting. She sees the recording of traditional sites and ceremonies on canvas as an important part of both sustaining and fostering the great traditions of her culture.

The Haasts Bluff and Kintore areas have produced many notable artists and Maisie is one of the most interesting of a new wave that is emerging.

 

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

  • 2006 Towards Black and White, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA
  • 2009 Watiyawanu Artists, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA
  • 2014 Desert Song, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle WA

Her paintings represent the stories from her father’s country – Karku and include Yalka – Bush Onion, Kampurarrpa – Bush Tomato and Kunga Tjurkurpa – Women’s Stories, these still take place in the area between Kintore and Kiwirrkurra in Western Australia.

MORE ARTWORKS BY THE ARTIST

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