Narpula Scobie Napurrula - WOMEN'S CEREMONY NS1682

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Narpula Scobie Napurrula Women’s Ceremony Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas NS1682
Women’s Ceremony Narpula Scobie Napurrula Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas NS1682
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Narpula Scobie Napurrula Women’s Ceremony NS1682
Aboriginal Artwork on canvas by Narpula Scobie Napurrula Women’s Ceremony NS1682
Narpula Scobie Napurrula Women’s Ceremony Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas NS1682
Women’s Ceremony Narpula Scobie Napurrula Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas NS1682
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Narpula Scobie Napurrula Women’s Ceremony NS1682
Aboriginal Artwork on canvas by Narpula Scobie Napurrula Women’s Ceremony NS1682

PROVENANCE

The provenance of works of fine art is of great significance, especially to their owner. There are a number of reasons why painting provenance is important. A good provenance increases the value of a painting, and establishing provenance may help confirm the date, artist and the subject of a painting. It may confirm whether a painting is genuinely of the period it seems to date from. Documented evidence of provenance for an object can help to establish that it has not been altered and is not a forgery, a reproduction, stolen or looted art. Provenance helps assign the work to a known artist, and a documented history can be of use in helping to prove ownership.

All artworks of our Gallery come with a AAA Gallery Certificate of Authenticity and where possible, working photographs and/or a photo of the artist with the artwork and/or video of an artist in working process of creating an artwork.

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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Lay-by is a system of paying a deposit to secure an article for later purchase. AAA Gallery offers you a four-month lay-by option on all artworks, allowing you to make regular payments towards that artwork you like.

A 25% initial deposit is required with the balance paid over a maximum of four months.  You will not be penalised if you prefer to pay your purchase sooner. Once you finalise the payments the goods will be dispatched immediately.

If this payment method is chosen when you checkout, we will email you a lay-by agreement to organise first instalment and subsequent the other three equal payments.  

Please contact us if you have any questions.

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Artist: Narpula Scobie Napurrula
Skin Name: Napurrula
Born: c.1950
Region: Kintore
Language: Pintupi
Subjects and Themes(Dreaming): Women`s stories.

 

ABOUT ARTIST

Born at Haasts Bluff, Narpula Scobie commenced painting for Papunya Tula Artists in the early 1980's and was one of the first women to do so in Walungurru. She was married to Johnny Scobie Tjapanangka (now deceased), a Pintupi

artist who was involved at the beginning of the art movement in Papunya. Narpula Scobie's art is still evolving and she finds new ways of depicting the traditional stories of her Dreamings. The majority of Narpula`s works depict bush food stories, reflecting her early life. Narpula has achieved considerable success over her career and her paintings are held in many collections locally and overseas.

GROUP EXHIBITIONS:

  • 2003 Chapel off Chapel Gallery (Watiyawamnu Artists), Melbourne
  • 2000 Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs
  • 1999 Flinders Art Museum Flinders University, Adelaide
  • 1998 Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs
  • 1995 Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs
  • 1988 "Australian Art", touring exhibition in China
  • 1987 "Art and Aboriginality", Portsmouth

COLLECTIONS:

  • Australian Museum, Sydney
  • South Australian Museum, Adelaide
  • Homes a Court Collection
  • Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide
  • Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane
  • Artbank, Sydney
  • Flinders Art Museum, Adelaide
  • The Kelton Foundation, Los Angeles CA, USA

AWARDS:

  • 2001 Finalist in 18th Telstra NATSIAA

SOURCE: Birnberg, M & Kreczmanski, JB 2004, Aboriginal artists dictionary of biographies: Western Desert, Central Desert and Kimberley Region, 1st edn., JB Publishing, Marleston.

The painting depicts body paint design, ceremonial site and rock holes associated with Pintupi women's ceremony, from the Western Desert, Aboriginal Art Regions of Central Australia.  Prior to their ceremony, the Aboriginal women paint their upper body, using ground ochres to create markings or body paint designs. Ceremonies include song and dance cycles.

MORE ARTWORKS BY THE ARTIST

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