Makinti Napanangka - WOMEN'S HAIR STRING MN1724

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Makinti Napanangka Women’s Hair String Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas MN1724
Women’s Hair String Makinti Napanangka Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas MN1724
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Makinti Napanangka Women’s Hair String MN1724
Aboriginal Artwork on canvas by Makinti Napanangka Women’s Hair String MN1724
Makinti Napanangka Women’s Hair String Australian Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas MN1724
Women’s Hair String Makinti Napanangka Australian Aboriginal Artwork on canvas MN1724
Aboriginal Art Painting on canvas by Makinti Napanangka Women’s Hair String MN1724
Aboriginal Artwork on canvas by Makinti Napanangka Women’s Hair String MN1724

PROVENANCE

The provenance of works of fine art is of great significance, especially to their owner. There are a number of reasons why painting provenance is important. A good provenance increases the value of a painting, and establishing provenance may help confirm the date, artist and the subject of a painting. It may confirm whether a painting is genuinely of the period it seems to date from. Documented evidence of provenance for an object can help to establish that it has not been altered and is not a forgery, a reproduction, stolen or looted art. Provenance helps assign the work to a known artist, and a documented history can be of use in helping to prove ownership.

All artworks of our Gallery come with a AAA Gallery Certificate of Authenticity and where possible, working photographs and/or a photo of the artist with the artwork and/or video of an artist in working process of creating an artwork.

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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A 25% initial deposit is required with the balance paid over a maximum of four months.  You will not be penalised if you prefer to pay your purchase sooner. Once you finalise the payments the goods will be dispatched immediately.

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Artist: Makinti Napanangka
Skin Name: Napanangka
Born: c.1932 - 2011
Region: Kintore
Language: Pintupi
Subjects and Themes(Dreaming): Kungka Kutjarra (Two Women Dreaming)

 

ABOUT ARTIST

Makinti Napanangka was born in approximately 1930 and sadly passed away in January 2011. She was born in the area of Karrkurritinytja (Lake Macdonald) in the Western Desert of Central Australia. Makinti is considered one of Australia’s most influential and talented Aboriginal artists post the Emily Kame Kngwarreye era and prior to her death

was considered Australia’s most collectable living Aboriginal artist. She was from the Pintupi language group and region of Central Australia.

Makinti shared that her first contact with white people was seeing them ride camels when she was living at Lupul. She was one of a large group of people who walked into Hassts Bluff in the early 1940’s, together with her husband Nyukuti Tjupurrula (brother of well known Aboriginal artists Nosepeg Tjupurrula) and their infant son Ginger Tjakamarra. Whilst living in Haasts Bluff they had their second child, Narrabri Narrapayi in 1949.  In the late 1950’s the family relocated to Papunya, another Aboriginal community, it was here that they had their third child, Jacqueline Daaru in 1958. In 1961 they welcomed their fourth child Winnie Bernadette in Alice Springs. Finally in the early 1980’s the family relocated to Kintore when it was first established.

Makinti began painting for Papunya Tula Artists in 1996 but had already had experience working with acrylic paints and canvas during the Kintore and Haasts Bluff art project held in 1993/1994. Her children Ginger, Narrabri (1949 -2010) and Jacqueline all went on to have artistic career with Papunya Tula Artists as well. Makinti’s career took off during the mid 1990’s as interest grew and her unique style developed.

A physically small woman she was very robust and strong. Her art is characterised by a more spontaneous approach in illustrating traditional iconography so often seen in Pintupi artwork. Her artworks may seem very abstract with the interplay of colours such as yellow, orange and white with circles and lines throughout however her paintings are still very much based on her Dreaming of Kungka Kutjarra (Two Women). The lines that are found throughout her artworks relate to the hair string ceremonial skirts that women would wear during Pintupi ceremonies. Songs and dances are performed and these are also represented in her artworks through repetitive clusters of lines.

Making’s artwork is represented in some of the most significant Australian public art collections. She has participated in countless exhibitions since the start of her artistic career and has been recognised as being in the top 50 most collectable Aboriginal Artists of all time. Over her career she was a selected entrant on many occasions in Australians most prestigious art prize, the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award and was the overall winner of this in 2008. She was also a finalist in the 2003 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award.

 

 

GROUP EXHIBITIONS:

• 2008, “Makinti Napanangka Feature”, Central Art – Aboriginal Art Store, Alice Springs.

• 2008, “Pintupi”, Central Art – Aboriginal Art Store, Alice Springs.

• 2008, “11 Amazing Women Artists”, Central Art – Aboriginal Art Store, Alice Springs.

• 2008, “Black & White: Inspired by Landscapes”, Kate Owen Gallery, Sydney.

• 2005, “Pintupi Women”, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2005, “New Ideas”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2005, “Papunya Tula Artists”, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne. 

• 2005, “Luminous: Contemporary Art from the Australian Desert”, Manly Art Gallery and Museum, Sydney.

• 2004, “Pintupi Art 2004”, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2004, “Depth of Field: Anamorphosis”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2004, “Papunya Tula Artists – 2004”, aGallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2004, “All About Papunya”, Chapman Gallery, Canberra.

• 2004, “Aboriginal Art 2004”, Scott Livesay Art Dealer, Melbourne.

• 2004, “Ma yungu/Pass it on”, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2004, “Melbourne Art Fair”, Melbourne.

• 2004, Redlands Westpac Art Prize, Mosman Art Gallery, Sydney.

• 2004, “Pintupi Artists”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2004, “Mythology & Reality”, Heidi Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne.

• 2004, “Colour Power: Aboriginal Art Post 1984”, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Pintupi Art 2003”, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2003, “Papunya Tula Selected Paintings”, William Mora Galleries, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Aboriginal Art 2003”, Scott Livesay Art Dealer, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Pintupi Art from the Western Desert”, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2003, “Clemenger Contemporary Art Award Exhibition”, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Masterpieces from the Western Desert”, Gavin Graham Gallery, London, U.K.

• 2003, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2003, “Pintupi Artists”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2003, “Recent Paintings by the Women Artists of Kintore and Kiwirrkurra”, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Makinti Napanangka: A Painter”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2002, “Next Generation: Aboriginal Art 2002”, Art House Gallery, Sydney.

• 2002, “Paintings from Our Country”, tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2002, William Mora Galleries, Melbourne.

• 2002, “Pintupi Men’s and Women’s Stories”, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2002, “Art Born of the Western Desert”, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2002, “Saluting Papunya”, Chapman Gallery, Canberra.

• 2008, “Makinti Napanangka Feature”, Central Art – Aboriginal Art Store, Alice Springs.

• 2008, “Pintupi”, Central Art – Aboriginal Art Store, Alice Springs.

• 2008, “11 Amazing Women Artists”, Central Art – Aboriginal Art Store, Alice Springs.

• 2008, “Black & White: Inspired by Landscapes”, Kate Owen Gallery, Sydney.

• 2005, “Pintupi Women”, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2005, “New Ideas”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2005, “Papunya Tula Artists”, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne. 

• 2005, “Luminous: Contemporary Art from the Australian Desert”, Manly Art Gallery and Museum, Sydney.

• 2004, “Pintupi Art 2004”, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2004, “Depth of Field: Anamorphosis”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2004, “Papunya Tula Artists – 2004”, aGallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2004, “All About Papunya”, Chapman Gallery, Canberra.

• 2004, “Aboriginal Art 2004”, Scott Livesay Art Dealer, Melbourne.

• 2004, “Ma yungu/Pass it on”, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2004, “Melbourne Art Fair”, Melbourne.

• 2004, Redlands Westpac Art Prize, Mosman Art Gallery, Sydney.

• 2004, “Pintupi Artists”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2004, “Mythology & Reality”, Heidi Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne.

• 2004, “Colour Power: Aboriginal Art Post 1984”, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Pintupi Art 2003”, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2003, “Papunya Tula Selected Paintings”, William Mora Galleries, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Aboriginal Art 2003”, Scott Livesay Art Dealer, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Pintupi Art from the Western Desert”, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2003, “Clemenger Contemporary Art Award Exhibition”, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Masterpieces from the Western Desert”, Gavin Graham Gallery, London, U.K.

• 2003, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2003, “Pintupi Artists”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2003, “Recent Paintings by the Women Artists of Kintore and Kiwirrkurra”, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2003, “Makinti Napanangka: A Painter”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2002, “Next Generation: Aboriginal Art 2002”, Art House Gallery, Sydney.

• 2002, “Paintings from Our Country”, tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2002, William Mora Galleries, Melbourne.

• 2002, “Pintupi Men’s and Women’s Stories”, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2002, “Art Born of the Western Desert”, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2002, “Saluting Papunya”, Chapman Gallery, Canberra.

• 2002, “Spring Exhibition 2002”, Scott Livesay Art Dealer, Melbourne.

• 2002, “Pintupi Artists”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2002, “Melbourne Art Fair”, Melbourne.

• 2002, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs.

• 2002, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2001, “Palm Beach Art Fair”, Palm Beach, Florida, USA.

• 2001, “Art of the Pintupi”, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide.

• 2001, “Aboriginal Art 2001”, Scott Livesay Art Dealer, Melbourne.

• 2001, “Desert Flowering”, Manawatu Art Gallery, North Island, New Zealand.

• 2001, “Dreamscapes: Contemporary Desert Art”, Mostings Hus, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

• 2001, “Papunya Tula 30th Anniversary Exhibition”, Chapman Gallery, Canberra.

• 2001, Indigenart, Perth.

• 2001, “Pintupi Exhibition”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2001, “Kintore and Kiwirrkurra”, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2001, “Dreamtime: Contemporary Aboriginal Art”, Essl Collection, Vienna, Austria.

• 2001, “Size Doesnt Matter”, William Mora Galleries, Melbourne.

• 2001, “Aborigena”, Palazzo Bricherasio, Turin, Italy.

• 2001, “Spirituality and Australian Aboriginal Art”, (touring exhibition) Communidad de Madrid, Spain.

• 2001, “Makinti Napanangka: New Paintings”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2000, Framed Gallery, Darwin.

• 2000, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 2000, “Pintupi Women”, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 2000, “Melbourne Art Fair”, Melbourne.

• 2000, “New Vision”, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 2000, “Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genuis”, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

• 1999, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 1999, “Moet & Chandon touring Exhibition”, RMIT Gallery, Melbourne.

• 1999, “Spirit Country: Contemporary Australian Aboriginal Art”, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Melbourne Museum, USA.

• 1998, “The Desert Mob Art Show”, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs.

• 1998, “15th annual National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award Exhibition”, Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin.

• 1998, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 1998, “Melbourne Art Fair”, Melbourne.

• 1997, “National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award Exhibition”, Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin.

• 1997, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

• 1997, “The Desert Mob Art Show”, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs.

• 1996, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs.

• 1996, Utopia Art, Sydney.

• 1995, “Minima Tjukurrpa”.

 

AWARDS:

• 2008, Winner, 25th annual National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin.

• 2003, Finalist, Clemenger Art Award, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

• 2001, Finalist, 18th annual National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin.

• 1998, Selected Entract, 15th annual National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin.

• 1997, Selected Entrant, 14th annual National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin.

 

COLLECTIONS: 

• National Gallery of Victoria.

• Art Gallery of New South Wales.

• Queensland Art Gallery.

• Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory.

• Shell Aboriginal Art Fund Collection.

• Collection of Margaret Levi and Robert Kaplan.

• Collection of Richard Klingler.

• Macquarie Bank Collection.

 

SOURCE:

• Art Gallery of New South Wales & Watson, Ken & Jones, Jonathan & Perkins, Hetti, (1965- 2004) Tradition Today: Indigenous Art in Australia, 1st edn, Art Gallery of New South Wales ; London : Thames & Hudson, Sydney, New South Wales.

• Birnberg, M & Krecsmanski, JB 2004, “Aboriginal Artists Dictionary of Biographies: Central Desert, Western Desert & Kimberley Region”, J.B. Publishing Australia, Marleston.

• Konau, Britta, Boles, Margo Smith, Kennedy, Brian, P & Hood 2006, “Dreaming Their Way: Australian Aboriginal Women Painters”, Scala Publishers, London.

 

 

The linear design in the painting represents Nyimparra, which are hand crafted hair-string belts or skirts, worn by the Pintupi Aboriginal Women during ceremonies, at the rock hole site of Lupul, south of Kintore, Aboriginal Art Regions of Central Australia.

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